Nginx and MariaDB Issues Fix on Upgrading DigitalOcean Droplet from Ubuntu 14.04.5 to 16.04.1

Today after I updated the packages on my blog digital ocean droplet (here’s my entire wordpress setup) I discovered that it was ready to be upgraded to the new Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS.

DigitalOcean already offers a wonderful guide for you to follow, but there were some caveats on my system that needed to be fixed before and after the upgrade.

Those were

  • MariaDB repository
  • Nginx failed to restart

here’s how I fixed it. Continue reading Nginx and MariaDB Issues Fix on Upgrading DigitalOcean Droplet from Ubuntu 14.04.5 to 16.04.1

How to Automatically Backup your OpenShift Applications with the Openshift Backup Server

Did you know there’s a way to automate the backup of your openshift apps?
I didn’t until I found it on the main OpenShift blogs.
Turns out there’s a whole webapp that does it beautifully and it takes 3 simple steps to setup a scheduled backup for your application. Continue reading How to Automatically Backup your OpenShift Applications with the Openshift Backup Server

Powerful and Cheap WordPress Blog Setup with PHP 7.0, NGNIX, Memcached and MariaDB 10.1 on DigitalOcean 512MB Droplet

I have a few wordpress blogs now, some of them had some spikes in visits, some are quite unpopular, but still I always wanted an easy and secure system to host them all without sacrificing speed and money.

After many trials and errors, I am quite happy with my actual setup which is

  • PHP7
  • Ubuntu 14.04
  • Nginx+Memcached
  • WordPress

All hosted on a 512MB droplet on DigitalOcean (ref.link) but you can easily use any VPS provider. I just like the overall DigitalOcean service and support. Continue reading Powerful and Cheap WordPress Blog Setup with PHP 7.0, NGNIX, Memcached and MariaDB 10.1 on DigitalOcean 512MB Droplet

How to migrate a Node.js App from Heroku to OpenShift

Given the recent price/tier changes of Heroku I wanted to understand what alternatives do we have, as developers, to host a Node.js application free of charge.

Let me be clear upfront… there are not so many alternatives right now, and I can’t praise Heroku enough for putting out a free plan like the one in the past.
The new Heroku freeplan will limit the overall hours your app can stay on, therefore making it not very feasible for apps that need to be always on (although not very task-consuming).

So I decided to settle on OpenShift, and see how it would go.
To do the test I tried porting Haptime.in in OpenShift.

Let me show you what I discovered. Continue reading How to migrate a Node.js App from Heroku to OpenShift